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Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt on Thursday submitted the ballot title for State Question 788, a measure now that would legalize the use of medical marijuana in Oklahoma, reports Nadia Judith Enchassi at KFOR.

Oklahoma Atty. Gen. Scott Pruitt: "Quote" [KJRH]

Oklahoma Atty. Gen. Scott Pruitt:
“There are still steps remaining in order for the question to be placed on the ballot”
[KJRH]

“I commend the attorneys in my office for their diligent work to complete this ballot title in an efficient manner,” Pruitt said. “While my office has done its part by preparing the ballot title well before the September 1 deadline, there are still steps remaining in order for the question to be placed on a ballot.

“We are dealing with processes established in both federal and state election law for initiatives proposed by the people that require specific procedures to be followed,” Atty. Gen. Pruitt said. “Even with expedited efforts of both the Secretary of State’s office to count the signatures and my office to write the ballot title, the state is running up against deadlines imposed by this process. Read Full Article →

When Washington legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, a primary concern was how to ensure it was kept out of the reach of children.

While skunky-smelling buds of dried marijuana are not likely to appeal to children, cannabis-infused edibles such as brownies, cookies and candies could. And with edibles making up a sizable and growing segment of the pot market, states are grappling with how to regulate those products to most effectively protect children.

A new report from the University of Washington School of Law’s Cannabis Law and Policy Project furthers those efforts by identifying the factors that make food attractive to children. Commissioned by the state Liquor and Cannabis Board, the report involved looking at research on what physical elements of food appeal to children and the role that marketing and branding play. Read Full Article →

New Frontier, a cannabis Big Data and analytics company, in partnership with Arcview Market Research, a publisher of cannabis market research, has released its 2016 California Legal Cannabis Market State Profile, which shows the potential growth of the adult use market if California voters choose to legalize adult use cannabis in November.

Giadha DeCarcer, New Frontier: "Quote" [New Frontier]

Giadha DeCarcer, New Frontier:
“California is the cannabis market that is going to catapult the industry forward if they legalize adult use in November”
[New Frontier]

Over the next four years, annual legal cannabis sales will grow at a compound annual growth rate of 23.1 percent, from $2.8 billion in 2016 to an estimated $6.5 billion by 2020, according to the report.

“California is the cannabis market that is going to catapult the industry forward if they legalize adult use in November,” said Giadha DeCarcer, founder and CEO of New Frontier.

“It is the largest and most influential state in the cannabis industry in terms of production, consumption, and cultural influence. The legalization of adult use in California will have far-reaching effects, both within the state and nationally,” DeCarcer said. Read Full Article →

Marijuana vape company to donate all its proceeds
beginning August 22 through Labor Day

SOURCEvapes, manufacturer of vaporizer equipment, on Monday announced that 100 percent of all sales profits from its online store will be donated to Louisiana relief efforts from today through Labor Day.

With over 40,000 homes and 100,000 people affected, we really want to get the word out there so we can donate at least $50,000 to help combat the extreme devastation the floods in Louisiana have caused,” said Robert Kayvon, president of operations for SOURCEvapes.

According to Kayvon, SOURCEvapes will donate all profits from purchases made from August 22 until Labor Day on September 5. Read Full Article →

Here comes another competitor for WeedMaps and Leafly.

MassRoots, a technology platform for the cannabis industry, on Monday announced the launch of its dispensary finder to its community of more than 900,000 cannabis enthusiasts.

Isaac Dietrich, MassRoots: "Quote" [LinkedIn]

Isaac Dietrich, MassRoots:
“MassRoots’ dispensary finder serves as a solid foundation for several features we plan to introduce in the coming weeks”
[LinkedIn]

“Through its iOS and Android apps, MassRoots aims to connect its passionate, engaged community with the best dispensaries and products in their local area,” the company’s prepared statement reads.

“MassRoots’ dispensary finder serves as a solid foundation for several features we plan to introduce in the coming weeks – menus with live pricing, community reviews, and product recommendations,” said MassRoots CEO Isaac Dietrich. “We believe each of these features will create new revenue streams while enhancing our user experience.”

Improvements to MassRoots’ business portal are being engineered concurrently with new in-app features, according to the company.

Read Full Article →

This means that Arkansans will have a choice.

Arkansans strongly favor medical cannabis, and this year it looks like they’ll get a choice about the kind of medical marijuana program they want to establish in 2017. David Couch, a Little Rock-based attorney leading a petition drive to put a medical marijuana amendment on November’s ballot, said he’d turned in additional signatures to the secretary of state and had exceeded the number needed to qualify for a vote.

Arkansans United for Medical Marijuana on Friday turned in about 23,000 additional signatures which will likely secure their initiative — The Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment (AMMA) — a spot on the upcoming November ballot, right next to The Arkansas Medical Cannabis Act (AMCA), a statute which has been certified for the state ballot since July.

 

Couch said the office had verified 72,309 signatures on his original submission, leaving him about 12,000 short of the requirement of 84,859 signatures, reports Max Brantley at the Arkansas Times. He said he’d been meeting with the Arkansas Secretary of State and he said he believed the office was ready to add as many as 4,000 signatures originally rejected.

Read Full Article →

[The Arizona Marijuana Initiative 2016 / Facebook]

[The Arizona Marijuana Initiative 2016 / Facebook]

Confirms Proposition 205 Was Rightfully Placed on the November Ballot

Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol calls on Yavapai and Maricopa county prosecutors, who were plaintiffs in the lawsuit, to accept the court’s ruling and focus on fighting serious crimes instead of citizen initiatives

A Maricopa County Superior Court judge on Friday dismissed a lawsuit filed by opponents of Proposition 205 who want to keep the measure off the November ballot.

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, which is supporting Proposition 205, is calling on Yavapai County Attorney Sheila Polk and Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery, who were plaintiffs in the lawsuit, to accept the court’s ruling and focus on fighting serious crimes instead of citizen initiatives.

J.P. Holyoak, Campaign To Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol: "Quote" [Phoenix Business Journal]

J.P. Holyoak, Campaign To Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol:
“This was a frivolous and politically motivated lawsuit”
[Phoenix Business Journal]

“We are pleased with the court’s ruling and that Arizona voters will be able to exercise their right to vote on Proposition 205,” said CRMLA Campaign Chairman J.P. Holyoak. “This was a frivolous and politically motivated lawsuit.

“If these county prosecutors dislike this ballot measure, they should take their arguments to the voters, not to our overburdened court system,” Holyoak said. “We hope they will accept the court’s ruling and return to waging legal battles against dangerous criminals rather than citizen initiatives.” Read Full Article →

New Report Finds Nearly 9,000 Felony Arrests for Marijuana in 2015, with Blacks and Latinos Enduring Greatest Burden of Marijuana Enforcement  

A new report by the Drug Policy Alliance shows that there were nearly half a million marijuana felony and misdemeanor arrests in California between 2006 and 2015. Thousands of Californians are arrested annually for marijuana misdemeanors and felonies.

These arrests are not equal. Black and Latino Californians are arrested for marijuana offenses at disproportionately high rates. In addition, youth under 18 years of age now make up the majority of misdemeanor arrestees.

In 1996, California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana when voters passed the Compassionate Use Act (Prop. 215). In 2011, California lawmakers reduced possession of up to an ounce of marijuana for personal use from a misdemeanor to a non-arrestable infraction, similar to a traffic ticket. Read Full Article →

Hempfest CEO John Davis, left, and Executive Director Vivian McPeak, right. Davis has financial ties to I-502 businesses which successfully lobbied the Washington Legislature to shut down medical marijuana dispensaries in the state. [Amy Radil/KUOW]

Hempfest VP John Davis, left, and Executive Director Vivian McPeak, right. Davis has financial ties to I-502 businesses which successfully lobbied the Washington Legislature to shut down medical marijuana dispensaries in the state. McPeak refused to publicly oppose I-502, preferring to stay “neutral” while safe access went down in flames… on the altar of corporate profits
[Amy Radil/KUOW]

Brothers and sisters of the weed! Can you do me a favor this weekend?
Bear Witness!

Every time you see a social media post about Seattle Hempfest, can you just leave “Bummer about the patients!” in the comments, to remind folks — especially Vivian McPeak and John Davis of Hempfest — it’s not all about getting high?

Bummer about the patients!

Remember: Hempfest management threw medical cannabis patients, and safe access, under the bus in the name of corporate profits. Davis actually SUPPORTED I-502, and McPeak didn’t have the balls to oppose it — Vivian was “neutral” like some bullshit, spineless politician. Read Full Article →

Seattle Police Sgt. Sean Whitcomb, left, and Hempfest Executive Director Vivian McPeak, 2013. [Joshua Trujilloa/Seattle PI.com]

Seattle Police Sgt. Sean Whitcomb, left, and Hempfest Executive Director Vivian McPeak
[Joshua Trujilloa / Seattle PI.com]

“We’re collaborating with the police,” Seattle Hempfest executive director Vivian McPeak was saying from the stage.

“There will be no marijuana sales tolerated at Seattle Hempfest.”

That first sentence wasn’t one I once would have expected McPeak to utter, but then again, it’s been awhile since he seemed very real as an activist; he’s actually much more of a blowhard politician these days.

The other part, however — about no sales — represents no change from past years’ Hempfest policy. You could always get ejected from the festival for selling weed, and Washington state voters’ 2012 approval of the limited “legalization” measure I-502 by Washington voters certainly didn’t have any impact on that.

Still, it was just a tad surreal to hear Vivian’s speech from the Main Stage, threatening folks with the cops, even as two different weed vendors offered their wares to me and other members of the crowd. There was the guy with a green Mohawk wig selling “dime bags” and cannabis lozenges; there was the young lady walking around openly selling eighths and quarters directly in front of the Main Stage (when no black shirts — the wanna-be authoritarian Hempfest security staff — were around) even as McPeak’s words echoed through Myrtle Edwards Park. Read Full Article →